Charnwood

Chapter 11

Published Mar, 2007

Charles Draper, J.P. (1825 -1909) of Charnwood. The author's great-grandfather. Photo taken in 1905 when Charles was 80 years old. Photo credit Draper family

…Charles Draper named his selection ‘Charnwood’, after the Charnwood Forest area of Leicestershire, where he was born…

In 1862, Charles Draper and John Ryder, taking advantage of the recently passed Duffy Land Act, wandered over the stringybark forested ranges to the east of the Plenty in search of land they could call their own. Since about 1856, Charles Draper had been a tenant farmer and ‘enthusiastic fruit cultivator’ on the Donaldson square-mile at Kangaroo Ground. John Ryder, a native of Devonshire, ‘was for ten years at the Plenty’. Ryder’s selection included the site of the present Arthurs Creek township.

Charles Draper selected adjoining land to the north, with excellent shelter and running water suitable for fruit growing. He named his selection ‘Charnwood’, after the Charnwood Forest area of Leicestershire, where he was born. ‘It was objected by the land officers that the site was too near Melbourne to be taken up under the act, but that objection was overcome’.

‘Taking a bullock dray on to the selection was a most difficult job…’. Draper and Ryder built their homesteads adjacent to each other on the western side of the Running Creek, near the junction with the Deep Creek and Arthurs Creek. John Ryder’s dwelling was located on the flat below the school. James (Jim) Draper, the third son of Charles and Catherine Draper, was born at ‘Running Creek’ on 9 January 1863 with Mrs. (Jane) Ryder acting as midwife.

The work of preparing the country for planting was ‘one of a gigantic nature’. ‘Whilst this was being done, dairying was carried on for subsistence’. Some of the first fruit trees, brought from Kangaroo Ground, grew with vigour in the fertile alluvial soil of the valleys. Newspaper reports described progress. ‘The first trees occupying only about two acres were planted in 1864. Then new sorts were procured from which to propagate, and the next planting took place in 1867, and has been continued yearly from that time. By repeated selections, Draper increased his holding to 320 acres in one block, besides 186 acres purchased at a short distance.’ Others followed his example and also planted fruit trees with the result that by the 1880s, Arthurs Creek became a major source of Melbourne’s fruit supply.

The Leader, in 1872, reported that ‘As a student of pomology, Mr. Draper is most careful to keep his stock true to name, and the young stock which is raised for sale or for use in the extension of the orchard is in the highest state of health and vigour’. ‘The whole of the fruits being grown for market purposes, it is of course the study of the proprietor to cultivate largely those kinds most suitable and good travellers, the distance from town being great.’

One early variety grown at Charnwood was the Jonathan apple, first introduced into Victoria from America by the Horticultural Society in about 1871. Another successful variety introduced to the district from Ballarat was Stewart’s Seedling. Both varieties were once widely grown throughout the Arthurs and Diamond Creek districts.

In July 1871, Charles was elected to the Practical Committee of the Horticultural Society of Victoria, which in 1885 became the Royal Horticultural Society of Victoria. He was a member of the Fruit Committee and was appointed a Trustee of the Society’s Experimental Gardens at Richmond. A regular exhibitor at Monthly meetings and Horticultural Exhibitions, Charles Draper later became a Vice-President and Fellow of the Society.

At the Second Intercolonial Exhibition held in Sydney in 1873, Charles was awarded a bronze medal for his display of fruits. He became one of the first Victorians to export apples to Europe, which were displayed at the Vienna International Exhibition in 1873. Apples and pears from Charnwood were also sent for display at the Centennial Exhibition, Philadelphia, in 1876.

He was awarded a silver medal for his collection of fruits at the International Exhibition Melbourne 1880-81. In 1886, fruit from Charnwood was sent with the trial export to London of fruit and vegetables for sale, and partly for exhibition at the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, London 1886.

A bronze medal was awarded for services as a juror at the Centennial International Exhibition, Melbourne 1888. At the Centennial Horticultural Exhibition, held at Richmond Park in March 1889, Charles was awarded first prize for 50 and 24 varieties of apples, and also for 50 and 24 varieties of pears.

Charles was the first large-scale fruit grower in the Arthurs and Diamond Creek districts. The name of Charnwood orchards and its owner became well known throughout Victoria and the neighbouring colonies and the property welcomed many visitors. By the 1890s there were 200 acres of fruit trees. At this time the fruit collection at Charnwood included ‘about 700 varieties’ of apples.

In May 1890, Charles Draper was one of the fruit and vinegrowing experts who accompanied the first Parliamentary Visit to Mildura. He was elected President of the Arthurs Creek Fruit Growers’ Association when it was formed on May 12 1890. He was to serve as President for the next 14 years. In February 1891 he was appointed to the Board of Advice for Management of the Burnley Horticultural Gardens.

Visitors to Charnwood admired the flower garden as much as the orchard. The tuberous begonias were ‘for many years the finest to be seen in Victoria’. The Leader in 1890 noted that ‘Mr. Draper has planted a few vines by way of experiment, which are doing well, and he is of the opinion that the whole of the hills might be advantageously covered with wine grapes’.

At the second conference of Australasian Fruitgrowers held in Hobart during April 1895, Charles Draper ‘gave his experience in growing filbert and other nuts’. Against competition from Tasmania and New Zealand, he ‘took first honours’ in the section open to all Australasia for collections of apples at the Intercolonial Fruit Show held in conjunction with the conference. ‘The judges awarded it to him for the large number of varieties, the excellence of the exhibits, and the correctness of nomenclature.’

In later years fruit growing activities at Charnwood came  under the direct supervision of his sons, William (Bill) Plenty of ‘Dishleigh’ and James (Jim), later of ‘Barton Hill’. Bill Draper looked after the marketing, while Jim was responsible for nursery operations.

The end of an era came in 1903, when the Charnwood estate was subdivided into four orchard and grazing allotments of from 50 to 90 acres for sale by auction at Kirk’s Bazaar, Melbourne. The original homestead block was retained and, together with a portion of Ryder’s original selection, is still held within the family as a grazing property.

Charles Draper died at Charnwood, at the age of 84 years, on 23 April 1909. The Minister for Agriculture George Graham MLA, referring to his death, stated that he ‘was a household word among fruit growers who regarded him as an authority on the orchard’.

Historic view across 'Charnwood' and the Running Creek valley to Mt. Sugarloaf. Photo credit Draper family
Charnwood Forest Leicestershire by Edward Davies (1841-1920). Credit Leicestershire County Council Museums Service
'Arthurs Creek', A painting by Harry Harward in 1878, reprinted with permission
Charles Draper amidst his beloved begonias. ‘His begonias at Charnwood were for many years the finest to be seen in Victoria'. He was instrumental in bringing the first School of Horticulture in Australia into existence. Photo credit Draper family
Catherine Draper (nee Chester), (1828 -1884) of 'Charnwood'. Photographed shortly before she died, aged only 56. Catherine was a descendant of William Chester of Chipping-Barnet, the ancestor of the Chesters of Blaby in Leicestershire, UK. Their arms bore 'Ermine, on a chief sable a griffin passant Argent'. Many descendants of the Chesters of Blaby can today be found in Connecticut, USA. In 1875 The Leader said Catherine 'not only manages the domestic concerns, but also assists him [Charles] in every part of the business, and is nearly as well acquainted with the individual trees and the different varieties of fruit as her husband. We trust to be pardoned for acknowledging her hearty hospitality and kindness.' The Fruit Garden at Charnwood Hazel Glen, Leader, Saturday 6 February 1875, trove.nla.gov.au Photo credit Draper family
James Draper (1802 - 1880) and Mary Draper (nee Price) (1804 - 1890), the parents of Charles Draper c 1875. After Charles purchased a home for his siblings he enabled his sisters Emma and Louisa (also pictured) to live in it, and then willed it to his daughter Fanny upon the death of his sisters. Photo credit Draper family
Charles Draper, J.P. (1825 -1909), the author's great-grandfather and a noted horticultural pioneer, he was the first large scale fruit grower in the Arthur’s and Diamond Creek districts. He was a co-founder and long-serving President of the Arthurs Creek Fruitgrowers’ Association. The Arthurs Creek Cemetery gates reference Charles Draper, Chairman of the Trustees for the Linton Cemetery, and James T. Murphy, Secretary of the Arthurs Creek Cemetery Trust. The cemetery underwent three names changes, from Hazel Glen Cemetery, to Linton Cemetery, to Arthurs Creek Cemetery. Photo taken in 1905 when Charles was 80 years old. Photo credit Draper family
Colonial and Indian Exhibition, London 1886. Commemorative Medal presented to Charles Draper. In 1875 The Leader wrote ‘the following are remarks on different varieties with which Mr. Draper was kind enough to favour us : In apples, Majetin is an excellent culinary sort, though hardly large enough. Irish Peach is short lived, being over-prolific. Northern Spy, a great favourite, is “grand,” it comes in bearing in 7 years’. The Fruit Garden at Charnwood Hazel Glen, Leader, Saturday 6 February 1875, trove.nla.gov.au Image credit Draper family
Left to right back row: John Charles Draper (1881-1968), James Draper (1863-1940), Mary Jane Draper (1859-1911). Front row: S.W. Atkinson, Mrs Atkinson, William Plenty Draper (1855 – 1907), Elinor ‘Isabel’ ‘Bel’ ‘Bella’ Draper (nee Williams, 1859 – 1932). Photo taken between 1893 and 1896. Information credit Bruce G. Draper, Lionel Draper, Pam Goodey and Ross McDonald. Photo credit McDonald and Draper families
This photo taken between 1893 and 1896 occurred on the same day as a family group portrait that we have also dated to this time. When viewing the two photos side by side it is clear that William and James are wearing the same clothes in each picture. On the left is William Plenty Draper (1855 – 1907) and on the right is his younger brother James Draper (1863-1940). They were both sons of Charles Draper (1825-1909) and Catherine Draper (nee Chester, 1828-1884). Photo and information credit Lionel Draper and Bruce G. Draper
Charles Draper with staff and students at Burnley Horticultural College c 1900. Messrs. William Anderson, Charles Draper and Henry Boyce were nominated to the Board of Advice for Management of the Horticultural Gardens. The Government appointees were David Martin, Secretary for Agriculture, Chairman, Joseph Harris and James Lang. George Neilson was appointed Curator. The Board of Advice was appointed on 16 February 1891. In May 1891, the first School of Horticulture in Australia came into existence
Charles Draper (possibly at the Mildura Fruit Growers Association) c 1890. In May 1890, Charles Draper was one of the fruit and vine growing experts who accompanied the first Parliamentary Visit to Mildura, at the joint invitation of the Mildura Shire Council and the firm of Chaffey Brothers Limited
Charles Draper at an Orchardists’ Demonstration where horticultural innovations, modern practices and knowledge were shared. On May 12, 1890, the Arthur’s Creek Fruit Growers’ Association was formed with Charles Draper as President, P.W.J. Murphy, Secretary and J. Herbert as Treasurer. Charles Draper was to serve as President for the next 14 years. The early efforts of the Arthur’s Creek Fruit Growers’ Association and the Diamond Creek Horticultural Society, formed in September 1884, provided the foundations for the advancement of the fruit growing industry in the Arthur’s and Diamond Creek districts
Charles Draper at a Royal Horticultural Society of Victoria meeting in Melbourne c 1885. In July 1871, Charles was elected to the Practical Committee of the Horticultural Society of Victoria, which in 1885 was to become the Royal Horticultural Society of Victoria. He was a member of the Fruit Committee and was appointed a Trustee of the Society’s Experimental Gardens at Richmond
Second annual trip of the students of the Horticultural College, Burnley to the Government Scent Farm at Dunolly, 23 November 1893. Charles Draper is standing in second row, fourth from the left. Photo: Nicholas Caire. Courtesy Bruce G. Draper. Charles Draper acted as a judge at many horticultural exhibitions throughout the colony. He was awarded a bronze medal for services as a juror at the Centennial International Exhibition, Melbourne, 1888
Visitors in the garden at 'Charnwood' c 1900. Left to Right: Charles Draper (1825 -1909), possibly a journalist, John McDonald (1853-1929), Jessie Ellen Fisher (1867- 1933), Maude Underwood (1891 – 1978, daughter of Emma Draper), and Emily 'May' Clinton (1881 - 1974, later Mrs John Charles Draper). The Garden Gazette reported that ‘After dinner our next move was across the creek and up the opposite slope, … to the vineyard, and through the vines, which were looking lusty and vigorous with promise of a good crop, after which we naturally adjourned to the wine cellar, for Mr. Draper, in addition to being a skilled horticulturist … , is also his own wine maker, producing a sound, dry white of excellent character.’ John McDonald’s son, John Henry McDonald (1888-1954) married Charles Draper’s granddaughter, Julie Catherine Draper (1891-1968), daughter of William Plenty Draper (1855-1907). This photo is special to both families for picturing these two Arthurs Creek pioneers together. They were close friends and neighbours before becoming family. Photo credit McDonald, Underwood and Draper families
1893 List of New Fruit Trees Grown For Sale By Charles Draper 'Charnwood', Arthurs Creek. This historic catalogue contains varieties that were popular at the time, in addition to new varieties that Charles Draper introduced to the market. Each variety has a detailed description. Apples include Delaware Red Winter, Isham Sweet, Lawver, M’Mahan’s White, M’Intosh Red, Mann, Walbridge, Wolf River, Beauty of Bath, Cumberland Favourite, Castle Major, Belle Pontoise, Hangan’s Golden Pippin, Harvey Wiltshire Defiance, Lady Sudeley, Potts’s Seedling, Queen Caroline, Red Bietigheimer, September Beauty, Pile’s Russet, Griton House. A cherry called Olivette. Peaches called Arkansas Traveller, Beer’s Smock, Bilyen’s Late October, Bonanza, Chinese Cling, Chair’s Choice, Elberta, Foster, Governor Garland, The Globe, Garey’s Hold-On, Large Early York, Lady Ingold, La Grange, Morris White, Muir, Nichol’s Organge Cling, Old Mixon Free, Pratt, Reeve’s Favourite, Schumaker, Thurber, The Wonderful, Wager, Wheat Land, Winter’s Cling. Plums including Grand Duke, Silver Prune, Kelsey. Pears called Belle D’Ecully, Beacon, Beurre Benoist, Beurre Baltet Pere, Beurre Dumont, Comte De Chambord, Doyenne De Melode, President D’Osmondville, Marie Benoist, Magnate. Image credit Draper family
Early invitation from the Arthurs Creek Fruit and Progress Association c 1912. Image credit Draper family
Harvesting Oaten Hay with the Reaper and Binder at 'Barton Hill'. The author's father, James (Jim) Chester Draper, lived on the family farm during his childhood at 'Barton Hill', Running Creek Road, Arthurs Creek. Photo credit: In the collection of the Draper family for use by "Yan Yean: A History" by Dianne Edwards, published by Yan Yean School Council, 1978
James Draper, 1863 - 1940 and Blanche Draper (nee Hurrey), 1880 - 1968; the author's grandparents. Pictured with their children, from left to right Lily (1906 - 2003), Thomas (1903 - 1959), Catherine (1901 - 1997), James Chester (the author's father, 1905 - 1998), and Muriel (1907 - 2003). Blanche is holding Leslie (1909 - 1992). Pictured at their property, 'Barton Hill', Yan Yean and Arthurs Creek district, Victoria c 1910. Photo credit James Chester Draper
Blanche Draper (nee Hurrey), 1880 - 1968 and James Draper, 1863 - 1940; the author's grandparents. Pictured during their engagement. They were married in 1900. Photo credit James Chester Draper
Blanche Draper (nee Hurrey), 1880 - 1968. The author's grandmother. Pictured at 'Barton Hill', Arthurs Creek c 1965. Photo credit James Chester Draper
Elizabeth Jullyan (nee Simpson), 1877 - 1956; the author's grandmother (on his mother's side), second from the left. Blanche Draper (nee Hurrey), 1880 - 1968; the author's grandmother (on his father's side), on the right. Pictured at 'Barton Hill', Arthurs Creek in front of the historic original kitchen c 1935. Photo credit Beatrice Violet Draper
Emma Draper, 1858 - 1903. Daughter of Charles and Catherine Draper. Pictured with her husband Thomas Underwood c 1890. Photo credit Underwood and Draper families
The daughters of Emma Draper, 1858 - 1903. Grandchildren of Charles and Catherine Draper. Maude Underwood, 1891 - 1978 and Mabel Underwood, 1892 - 1984, c 1906. Photo credit Underwood and Draper families
Fanny Catherine Draper, 1866 -1944. Daughter of Charles and Catherine Draper. Pictured with her husband William Henry Smith. They were married at Coton in the Elms, Derbyshire in 1896. Photo credit Smith and Draper families
Fanny Catherine Draper (1866-1944), pictured right, with her daughter Victoria 'Kathleen' Smith (1897-1978). Photo credit Draper and Smith families
Fanny Catherine Draper (1866-1944) and her daughter Victoria 'Kathleen' Smith (1897-1978). Photo credit Draper and Smith families
On the veranda at ‘Charnwood’ c 1896. Left to right back row: Mary Jane Draper (1859-1911), John Charles Draper (1881-1968, child of Joseph and Hannah Draper), James Draper (1863-1940). Front row: Fanny Catherine Draper ( 1866-1944), Charles Draper (1825-1909), Louisa Ann Dorothy Draper (1870-1938). Sitting on floor: Alfred Addison Draper (1888- 1967, brother of John Charles). Fanny was home visiting ‘Charnwood’ to arrange her dowry and wedding plans. Fanny sailed on the ‘Orizaba’ on 29 August 1896 for England and was married at Coton in the Elms, Derbyshire in November 1896. Joseph Charles Draper (1851–1902) and his wife Hannah (1857–1923, nee Laidlay) sent their eldest son John down from Glenburn, to stay with his grandfather Charles, for schooling at Arthurs Creek. In August 1896 The Evelyn Observer reported on the party given to send off Fanny to England; ‘cordial welcome and good cheer awaited all, the burly and general squire of Charnwood taking it as a delight to entertain his guests’. Information credit Bruce G. Draper, Lionel Draper, Ross McDonald and Pam Goodey. Photo credit Draper and McDonald families
'Charnwood', 1922. Roy McDonald (grandson of William Plenty Draper) remembered in the 1920s before starting school at Arthurs Creek and then Scotch College ‘they lived in the large building – with a weatherboard cottage beside, attached by a walkway…down the side of the house there were windows which we used to peer through to see the rooms full of furniture. We lived in this barn of a place with some stone floors, open fire place, big table…Mum used to say it was the servant’s quarters but….it could have been the kitchen because they had big parties’ credit Ross McDonald, ‘From Laggan to Arthurs Creek’. Photo credit Draper family
'Charnwood' photographed by Bruce G. Draper in 1968, showing the remains of the stables with the kitchen block behind. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
'Charnwood', Bruce G. Draper, 1968, showing the remains of the stables. The stables contained six stalls and were built during the 1870s using hand made bricks obtained from clay in a gully behind the stables. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
Visiting 'Charnwood' with the author's father, James Chester Draper (1905 - 1998) in 1987. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
The 'Charnwood' estate in 1972, showing the overgrown garden and remnant orchards on the original homestead block. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
Remains of 'Charnwood', Bruce G. Draper, 1968
'Charnwood' photographed by Bruce G. Draper in 1968, showing the remains of the stables with the kitchen block behind. Roy McDonald remembered that around 1920 ‘they lived in the large building – with a weatherboard cottage beside, attached by a walkway…down the side of the house there were windows which we used to peer through to see the rooms full of furniture. We lived in this barn of a place with some stone floors, open fire place, big table…Mum used to say it was the servant’s quarters but….it could have been the kitchen because they had big parties’ credit Ross McDonald, ‘From Laggan to Arthurs Creek’. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
Stripping oats in 1925 at 'Barton Hill', the home of James Draper, 1863 - 1940 and Blanche Draper (nee Hurrey), 1880 - 1968; the author's grandparents. Photo credit Draper family
Stripping oats at 'Barton Hill', one of the historic Draper family properties in the Yan Yean and Arthurs Creek districts, 1925. Photo credit Draper family
Binder at 'Barton Hill' c 1950. Photo credit Draper family
My father, James Chester Draper was born in 1905 at 'Barton Hill', and was known as Chester in the Arthurs Creek area so as not to be confused with his father, Jim Draper. However my father was also known as Jim when he lived in Heyfield. Photo credit Draper family
Thomas McMillan, maker. Apple model – Winter Majetin, Hazelglen, Victoria, 1875. Wax, pigment. On loan from Museum Victoria. The Technological and Industrial Museum’s economic botany collection recorded and advertised the economic potential of Australia’s agricultural products. Among these were fruit and vegetables. In order to demonstrate Victoria’s capacity in this area of production, and in the absence of colour photography, the museum commissioned wax models of local specimens. Trained model makers, many of whom were women, worked in the museum laboratory making models that documented healthy, diseased and unusual examples of fruit and vegetables. These were placed on permanent display for the education of the general public. This model is of a Winter Majetin, a cooking apple, which was grown by Charles Draper of Hazelglen in 1875 (Hazelglen was then the district name, later being named Arthurs Creek and Doreen). Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
Illustrations for wax fruit models. The Horticultural Society played a prominent part in the development of the fruit export trade. Mr Charles Draper was one of the first Victorians to export apples, which were included in the shipment arranged by Mr John Carson of Kew for display at the Vienna International Exhibition in 1873. This was the first time fresh fruit had been exported from Victoria to Europe. Prior to this modelled fruits in wax were sent overseas for display. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
Thomas McMillan, maker. Apple model – Winter Majetin, Hazelglen, Victoria, 1875. Wax, pigment. On loan from Museum Victoria. The Technological and Industrial Museum’s economic botany collection recorded and advertised the economic potential of Australia’s agricultural products. Among these were fruit and vegetables. In order to demonstrate Victoria’s capacity in this area of production, and in the absence of colour photography, the museum commissioned wax models of local specimens. Trained model makers, many of whom were women, worked in the museum laboratory making models that documented healthy, diseased and unusual examples of fruit and vegetables. These were placed on permanent display for the education of the general public. This model is of a Winter Majetin, a cooking apple, which was grown by Charles Draper of Hazelglen in 1875 (Hazelglen was then the district name, later being named Arthurs Creek and Doreen). Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
Orchards at 'Barton Hill', Yan Yean, the home of James and Blanche Draper c 1920. Photo credit Draper family
The spectacular begonias in the Ballarat Botanical Gardens are renowned to this day. ‘Mr. W.L. Hartland of Creswick, officer in charge of the State nursery, and champion begonia grower of Victoria,’ purchased the begonia collection from the ‘Charnwood’ estate in June 1909. The Hartland collection, including the Charnwood collection, is reputed to have been a significant addition to the Ballarat collection. The author is pictured in 2006 at the annual Ballarat Begonia Festival. Photo credit C. Ashley
Portrait of Moses Thomas Jnr A.I.F. probably taken in Egypt about 1917. Moses Charles Thomas was one of five children born to Louisa Thomas (nee Draper) (1870-1938) and James Thomas, son of Moses Thomas and Ann Thomas (nee McLean). James and Louisa were farmers at Scubby Creek, now known as Humevale. Moses enlisted in the army in 1916 and became a Lance Corporal of the 5th Light Horse Regiment, returning to Australia in 1919. From a Draper family history compiled by Pam Goodey
The garden at 'Charnwood' c 1900 with Charles Draper (1825 -1909) and Jessie Ellen Fisher (1867- 1933). The Garden Gazette of 1902 wrote of its visit to Charnwood with camera and pencil 'confronting you on every side as you ramble through the winding paths are roses of every hue, mostly teas, with a few fine old favourites, as Madame J. Lang, Captain Christy, Paul Heyron, La France, and other hybrid perpetuals of fragrant beauty, dainty polyanthus roses, Cecile Brunner, Perle D’Or, and Marie Pavie, wonderfully robust standards with glorious heads of massive blooms that would make a city florist’s fingers itch to pick them; and all growing at their own sweet will, yet tended with that consummate skill that removes all signs of neglect and decay, without destroying nature’s handiwork with formal trimming and prim devices.’ Photo credit Draper family
An original shingled roof of local timbers at 'Charnwood'. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
Pear tree near Running Creek above 'Charnwood', Arthurs Creek. At the International Exhibition Melbourne 1880-81, Charles Draper was awarded a silver medal for his collection of fruits. ‘That one grower (Mr. Draper) tabled a collection of 199 varieties of apples and 49 varieties of pears is noteworthy, in being perhaps an incident that has no parallel in the history of Victorian shows.’ Photo credit Bruce G. Draper, November 2003
Old stable at 'Charnwood', Arthurs Creek. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper, November 2003
Looking along the Running Creek towards 'Charnwood' from Brennan's Road East. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper November 2003
Running Creek valley near 'Charnwood'. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
The name Catherine has continued to be used by the descendants of the Draper pioneers of Arthurs Creek: Fanny Catherine Draper (1866-1944), daughter of Catherine Draper (nee Chester). Margaret Catherine Draper (1886-1890), daughter of Joseph Charles Draper. Julie Catherine Draper (1891-1968), daughter of William Plenty Draper. Catherine Annie Underwood (1894-1987), daughter of Emma Draper. Catherine Mary Jane Draper (1901-1997), daughter of James Draper. Grace Catherine Thomas (1903-1975), daughter of Louisa Ann Dorothy Draper. The name continues to be used into the present generations, including the author’s daughter, Catherine. Photo credit Bruce G. Draper
The Scottish links run deep in the Arthurs Creek district and surrounds, and the author eventually married a Scot. James and Julia Kinloch, the author's grandparents-in-law, Pitlochry, Scotland, 1923. Image credit Tyler, Kinloch and Draper families
Elinor Isabel (known as Isabel, Bel or Bella) Draper (nee Williams), 1859 - 1932. Isabel was the mother of Julie Catherine McDonald (nee Draper). Bel and her husband William Plenty Draper were active supporters of the Hazelglen Hall. Photo c 1910. Photo and information credit Pam Goodey
Annie, sister-in-law of Fanny Catherine Draper (1866-1944), with Fanny's daughter Victoria 'Kathleen' Smith (1897-1978). Photo credit Draper and Smith families
Young members of the Draper family. Photo credit Draper and Smith families
Fanny Catherine Draper (1866 -1944). Daughter of Charles and Catherine Draper. Fanny married William Henry Smith (1871-1939) in 1896. Photo credit Draper and Smith families
Victoria 'Kathleen' Smith (1897-1978), daughter of Fanny Catherine Draper (1866-1944) and William Henry Smith (1871-1939) . Photo credit Draper and Smith families
Victoria 'Kathleen' Smith (1897-1978), daughter of Fanny Catherine Draper (1866-1944) and William Henry Smith (1871-1939) . Photo credit Draper and Smith families
A mob of wild horses (brumbies) known as The Flyers frequented the foothills of the Plenty Ranges above Ardchattan. After coming down the spur between the Arthurs and Running Creeks, the horses stopped to drink from a clear pool with a rocky bottom. The pool, known as The Flyer’s Hole, was located not far from the site of the Charnwood homestead on the lower reaches of the Running Creek. Some of the first farm horses used by the Draper family came from this mob. James Chester Draper recalled some of his trips would be on un-broken horses. He and his siblings would charge the owner a pound to break the horse in. Please contact us if you are the credited owner of this photo
Chestnut tree in the garden at 'Charnwood', Arthurs Creek, 1905. Photo credit Draper family
'Charnwood' by A. Harvey, 1968. Image by A. Harvey is in the Draper family collection
The Leader of Saturday 13 September 1884 reported: It is with regret we hear of the death of Mrs. Charles Draper, Charnwood, after a lingering illness of some months’ duration. In her, Mr. Draper has lost a most excellent helpmate, who by her industry, frugality and good management must have contributed largely to his success in life, and her loss will be severely felt, although she has left some most excellent daughters behind her. Information credit Lionel Draper. Photo Arthurs Creek Cemetery June 2020. Bulbs planted by B.G. Draper and his daughter Catherine in 1975. Photo credit C. Ashley

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